Definitions of antisemitism: a quick guide


One of the more curious things said by Jackie Walker, recently suspended by the Labour Party and removed as Vice-Chair of Momentum (although retained on its Steering Committee) for comments she made at a Labour Party training event on antisemitism, was that she hasn’t “heard a definition of antisemitism that I can work with”. To aid Jackie, and for anybody else wondering about definitions of antisemitism, here is a quick guide to some of the definitions currently in use:

Indy’s Robert Fisk smears Shimon Peres as a man of ‘blood and slaughter’.


The headline of the Sept. 28th piece, “Shimon Peres was no peacemaker. I’ll never forget the sight of pouring blood and burning bodies at Qana”, says it all. Don’t remember Peres, Fisk is saying, as a statesman who held every major government position during his career, or a Nobel Peace Prize Winner for his efforts to reach an agreement with the Palestinians. Rather, he suggests, the thought of Peres should rightly evoke memories of tortured humanity inflicted by Israel’s cruel machines of war – a legacy of “blood, fire and slaughter”.

UK Media Watch prompts Daily Mail correction – admits that Bibi was cheered


As Israellycool and Yair Rosenberg reported, an internet myth was reported as news by the tabloids Page Six and Daily Mail on Sept. 26th regarding the reception received by Israel’s prime minister. Both publications claimed that Netanyahu was booed as he and his wife took their seats for a performance of “Hamilton” on Saturday night at Richard Rodgers Theatre in NYC.

An Israeli Arab asks the Guardian: Why didn’t you explain the reason Israel built its “wall”?


Yesterday, we posted about a Guardian article focusing on “walls within cities” all over the world that included paragraphs on Israel’s “wall” between east Jerusalem and the West Bank, yet didn’t include any information at all on the security reasons prompting its construction. As we also noted as a point of comparison, the Guardian article did manage to explain the security concerns motivating the erection of walls in Baghdad.

UK Media Watch prompts correction to Sunday Times’ Israeli “atrocities” claim


The sentence in question runs counter to a fundamental rule of journalistic accuracy and professionalism – codified in the Editors’ Code of Practice in the UK – demands that reporters clearly “distinguish between comment, conjecture and fact”. As we wrote in our complaint to Times of London editors, though the “atrocities” referenced in the sentence clearly represents only the allegations of anti-Israel campaigners, the wording suggests to readers that that this is a fact.

Guardian contributor’s tweet shows how ‘privilege’ narrative obfuscates antisemitism


The exodus of relatively prosperous (“privileged”) French Jews in recent years due to antisemitic attacks disproportionately carried out by poorer (“not privileged”) Muslims demonstrates that “privilege” does not necessarily protect you from the dangers of racism – whether it’s the racism from the ruling majority or from a ‘marginalized’ minority.

What the Guardian can teach the Czech Ministry of Education about Israel

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Following complaints from the Palestinian Ambassador to Prague, the Czech Education Ministry decided that Tel Aviv will replace Jerusalem as the capital of Israel in Czech school atlases used by elementary and secondary school students. “The data in the atlas will be corrected as of the New Year,” a Prague news site quoted a Czech Education Ministry spokeswoman as saying.

Guardian again whitewashes the extremism of Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP)

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For the second time in little over a year, the Guardian has managed to portray the radical, regressive anti-Zionist group Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) in a sympathetic light. The latest article, which appeared in the Guardian on Aug. 24th and is titled ‘GOP mega-donor funds group calling pro-Palestine US students ‘Jew haters’, reports on a Sheldon Adelson funded group which targets BDS and which accuses individual pro-Palestinian students of supporting terrorism and promoting antisemitism.

Guardian writer claims Google excluding Palestine to please customers.


The Guardian’s weapon of choice on Monday against the Jewish state was maps with Petter Hellström, a PhD candidate at the Department of History of Science and Ideas, Uppsala University, claiming, in the Science section, that Google “chose not to mark Palestine on their maps…to stay impartial in the eyes of customers and the surrounding society…their fellow westerners.”