Corrections

CiF Watch prompts Guardian correction over Arab Israeli population stats


We recently commented on a Guardian editorial, ostensibly about Jerusalem’s recent municipal elections, which managed to legitimize the extremist view that the Jewish state should be replaced with a bi-national one – a final ‘solution’ to the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict which, we noted, would be violently resisted by Jewish Israelis and lead to endless war.  

Here are the relevant passages:

As a thought experiment, however, it is fascinating. Extrapolating from the local situation in Jerusalem, what if all Palestinians made a strategic decision to seek full voting rights within the reality that is Israel, rather than demanding a separate Palestinian state? In other words, what if they transformed their struggle from a nationalist one into a civil rights one? 

Amid deepening despair as to the viability of a two-state solution, this is an option that is only going to attract more attention.

In addition to the profound immorality of denying Jews, and only Jews, their right to self-determination – a rejection of universal human rights implicit within the Guardian’s little “thought experiment” – there was also a factual error in the following passage:

Seventy-five per cent [of “Palestinians”] voted in the 1999 elections. Ten years later, it was 54%. The fact that it didn’t dip below half earlier this year was put down to a last-minute intervention by the Arab League urging the million or so Palestinians living in Israel to get out and vote [see footnote].

“Palestinians” is the Guardian term of choice for Israeli citizens who are ethnically or linguistically Arab – typically described as ‘Arab Israelis’, or ‘Arab citizens of Israel’ by most news outlets.  More importantly, contrary to the claim made in the sentence underlined above, there are actually over 1.6 million Arab Israelis, per Israel’s Central Bureau of Statistics.

cbs

 The Guardian undercounted this population by 600,000or so

After contacting Guardian editors, the following correction was added:

million

Whilst we commend editors on this narrow revision, there’s no word yet if the ‘theorists’ within their London salon – known, perhaps ironically, as their “editorial board” – have had second thoughts over their legitimization of the position that, just perhaps, the Jewish state shouldn’t exist. 

8 replies »

  1. Although the final results haven’t been released it looks like around 50% of all Israelis voted in this week’s local elections..

    The Arab leagues support for voting in Israel has to be balanced against active efforts by elements of the PA and Islamists to intimidate Arabs voting..

  2. How can it be a civil rights issue? They have the same rights to vote as every citizen does. The only ones that do not have that right are non-residents, and by definition they have no rights at all

      • Pretz. The context of this article was the MUNICIPAL elections that just took place in Israel. In those elections, all RESIDENTS in the relevant municipalities had a vote, whether they were citizens of Israel or not.

        So far as I am aware, the “Palestinians in the West Bank” to whom you refer who live outside Israeli municipal control had no vote whereas those who live within an Israeli municipality (for example in “East” Jerusalem) had the same right as any Jewish, Christian, Moslem or atheist Israeli living in the same area.

        Why is that wrong?

        • Further, Gee’s comment comes in the context of a discussion about the “million or so Palestinians (sic) living in Israel”, so we are clearly NOT talking here about those in Gaza or the “West Bank”.

    • Gee, “The only ones that do not have that right are non-residents, and by definition they have no rights at all”

      I’m afraid that simply is not true.
      Universal human rights are applied in Israel.
      Non residents have most basic rights as residents do.
      For example, just because someone is a tourist does not mean he / she doesn’t have the right to a fair trial or the freedom to worship etc.

  3. “Whilst we commend editors on this narrow revision, there’s no word yet if the ‘theorists’ within their London salon – known, perhaps ironically, as their “editorial board” – have had second thoughts over their legitimization of the position that, just perhaps, the Jewish state shouldn’t exist. ”
    You got tp the heart of this salon.