Economist

UK media lie begins: Jewish prayer rights activists cause Palestinian terrorism


chaya-zissel-braun-baby-terror-attack-jerusalem

Chaya Zissel Braun (3 months), killed by a Palestinian terrorist in Jerusalem on Oct. 22

The question of whether the recent increase in Palestinian terror attacks – which has included two lethal stabbings, and the murder of three Israelis by Palestinians who intentionally ran their vehicles into crowds of pedestrians in Jerusalem – will one day be categorized as the start of a new intifada is debatable.  

However, we can already see how the UK media will likely be framing the story if indeed the uptick in deadly attacks continue and increase: that demands by some Jews to be able to pray at the Temple Mount (the holiest site in Judaism) is responsible for the violence. 

A Nov. 6th article by the Guardian’s Peter Beaumont, following the two vehicular terror attacks, opined that “Demands for greater access have been blamed by Israelis and Palestinians for a recent increase in violent confrontations in Jerusalem”.

The Economist suggested – in an article in their print edition on Nov. 8th titled Temple Madness – that “dangerous campaign for Jewish prayer rights” is a form of “Jewish agitation” which is driving Palestinians to violence.

And, Ben Lynfield of The Independent – in a Nov. 10th report titled “Fears of new intifada: Israel is hit by wave of Palestinian violence linked to concerns over al-Aqsa mosque – was even more brazen in arguing that the recent deadly attacks on Israelis “was triggered largely by a Palestinian perception of an Israeli threat to al-Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem, Islam’s third holiest shrine.”

There is, of course, no threat to the al-Aqsa Mosque, and Israel’s prime minister has been adamant about the need to preserve the status quo at the holy site – where Jews are allowed to visit the site, but not to pray.

But, more importantly, the Guardian, Economist and Indy all have managed to ignore the role played by official Palestinian incitement when attempting to explain the recent attacks.

Here are a just a few such examples, ignored by Beaumont, Lynfield, and the (anonymous) Economist reporter.

On Oct. 17th, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas incited against Jews who merely visit the Temple Mount, in the following speech.

Abbas’s implicit call to violence was broadcast by Palestinian TV 19 times in 3 days.

Then, on Nov. 1, Abbas wrote a “letter of encouragement and support” to the family of Moatez Hejazi, the Palestinian terrorist who tried to assassinate Yehuda Glick, referring to Hejazi a “shahid” (martyr), who “rose to heaven while defending our people’s rights and holy places.”  

Abbas’s advisor Sultan Abu Al-Einein actually encouraged more violence by praising the terrorist murderers who carried out the recent attacks on Glick (and the Israeli pedestrians in Jerusalem) as the “illustrious and blessed children” who are “saturating the land of the homeland with their pure blood”.

Additionally, following the ‘run-over’ attacks in Jerusalem by Palestinian terrorists that have claimed three lives over the past two weeks, Abbas’ Fatah movement has been “actively encouraging Palestinians to carry out more such attacks on Israelis“.

Here’s one example.

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Fatah Facebook page posted a cartoon showing a car trying to ram into three fleeing Jews

Indeed – save one report in the Times of London – the UK media has ignored widely available evidence of official Palestinian incitement by Abbas, his advisors and PA governement ministries.

Finally, you have to ask yourself: Even if the Palestinian terrorists who’ve murdered five Israelis since Oct. 22nd  – Dalia Lamkus (25), Almog Shiloni (20), Jedan Assad (38), Chaya Zissel Braun (3 months), and Karen Mosquera (22) – were to claim that the mere possibility of Jews peacefully praying at the Mount motivated them to kill their victims, would this mean that we are to blame the advocates of Jewish prayer rights for causing the attacks?

The UK media’s need to impute an Israeli causation for Palestinian violence represents another characteristic denial of Palestinian agency, in suggesting that Palestinians can’t control their impulse to engage in terror attacks on innocent civilians in response to some perceived Jewish offense.

Reasonable people can of course continue to advocate for maintaining the status quo at the Mount – for practical reasons – while still rejecting the liberal racism which insists on treating Palestinians (on a moral level) like children who can’t be expected to behave civilly and responsibly when they don’t get their way. 

31 replies »

  1. “suggesting that Palestinians [sic] can’t control their impulse to engage in terror attacks on innocent civilians in response to some perceived Jewish offence” (not ‘offense’) – well, that seems to be the case where the so-called ‘Palestinians’ and the rest of the antisemitic Arab world are concerned, doesn’t it? This is Stone Age mentality, and unfortunately it’s alive and well in 2014. Obviously, one should not accept it as a good reason for stopping to do what is right (unless one is Brighton-rock antisemitic, like most of the UK media and much of the media elsewhere); but it should be recognised for what it is and part of the equation in the Middle East.

  2. The 3rd Intifada has started back in March.
    It is deemed different than the first two since it started in a slow wave rather than one spark.

  3. What I always find interesting about Arab anti-Semitic cartoons is the degree to which they use images of orthodox Jews, rather than secular Israelis.

    Clearly, they do not see any difference between the word “Jews” and the word “Zionists”.

    Unlike the “liberal” Europeans who infest sites like the Guardian but find it necessary to try to hide their anti-Semitism behind the idea that it is only “Zionists” they hate, the Arabs put it all out there for us to see.

  4. “was triggered largely by a Palestinian perception of an Israeli threat to al-Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem, Islam’s third holiest shrine.”

    The sentence would be correct with a little interpolation:
    … was triggered by antisemitic propaganda of the PA against Jewish praying at the Temple Mount giving the impression of a Israeli …

  5. At last; a logically argued piece in CiF watch (sorry if this comes over as patronising)

    If, as you say, the UK press is gearing up to frame the alleged push by Jews into Temple Mount as the cause of a new intifada it is because of the exasperation at Israel’s intransigence and doggedness in pursuing illegal settlements and tightening a military and economic stranglehold on Gaza.

    In some ways it reminds me of Northern Ireland: acts of atrocities by the IRA were rightly condemned, but the UK press (and UK in general) did little to understand what was driving these terrible acts. It was only when the UK government decided to at last negotiate with the terrorists that a degree of understanding came about. From this understanding a real peace process was agreed (with a ceasefire as a precondition) and we move towards normality.

    Israel needs to act bigger than it does, and make that move. The cost will be worth it.

    • Just stop writing as if you’ve got an unbiased approach to the Middle East. If you really were concerned about Palestinian state rights, then why don’t you ever acknowledge the 3 peace treaties put out by Israel since 2000?

      If you really were concerned about peace in the Middle East, then shouldn’t a hefty portion of scorn be on the people (Palestinian leadership) who not only rejected these peace offers, but did so without logical coutnerproposal? (A logical counterproposal does not mean one in which the Jewish State of Israel ceases to exist but rather one in which a Palestinian Arab state exists in co-existence.)

      The stupidity you relay time and again, Dinkleberry, is the primary reason for Palestinian bullshit. After all, they feel they can win the world over, and you’ve convinced them that, Yes, the majority of Morons will agree.

      • The usual moronic bullshit from dinkle. The settlements are not ‘illegal’, the intransigence is all on the Arab side, and the NI analogy has always been the last resort of halfwits.

      • Do you think peace will be achieved by scorning and by blaming? If so you you are the one who doesn’t want peace.

        There have been many attempts at peace treaties and agreements – they have all failed and both sides must accept that they have not done enough to make them work.

        If Israel could shake off its persecution complex and stride forward onto the world stage, the Palestinian strategy of waiting for the world’s pity to result in some sort of intervention/action, would melt away.

        But while people like you concentrate on the minutiae and brood on the injustice of it all, the goal of peace gets further away.

        Time to grow up.

        • If Israel could shake off its persecution complex and stride forward onto the world stage, the Palestinian strategy of waiting for the world’s pity to result in some sort of intervention/action, would melt away.
          Confusing some Freudian soundbits with the political realities on the ground, ignoring the constantly propagated second annihilation of Jews by the diverse Arab dictators, Palestinian terrorists, Muslim preachers etc. certainly vests you the competence to evaluate the age of others not sharing your opinion.

        • And you would call Ehud Barak offering Yasser Arafat all of GAza, 95% of the Judea and Samaria, and joint sovereignty over Jerusalem what, exactly?

          Speaking of growing up, there are more parts to a newspaper than comics and sports. Read up and grow up.

            • Ahh the smell of ‘Tamara’ squirming then running away and hoping that by not answering questions her/his/its ignorance will not be noticed.

              Wrong ‘Tamara’ your lack of any credibility has been noticed and noted.

            • Yes. Arafat found the very idea of peace offensive. And no matter how many times you bend over with your insults Tamara, no-one is interested in a piece of you.

        • The Palestinians need to do much more than they have to work for peace. There has been little done on the ground in this respect and the leadership, such as it is, has a problem in saying yes.

    • “but the UK press (and UK in general) did little to understand what was driving these terrible acts.”
      Glad to hear you admit it. The UK press (and UK in general) have an ongoing problem in this regard. The foul fruit they produce is tasted here in comments by you and Tamara.