Corrections

UK Media Watch prompts Telegraph correction to ‘illegal’ Israeli settlements claim


Previously, we posted about an article published in the Telegraph on Sept. 18th which included the following passage, concerning the US position on Israeli settlements in the West Bank.

We noted that, in fact, the US government has not characterized the settlements as “illegal” – opting instead for the non-legal designation of “illegitimate”.

We tweeted the Telegraph journalist who wrote the article, and emailed editors, calling out the error.

Today, they corrected the passage, which now reads:

revised-telegraph

We commend Telegraph editors for the correction.

Categories: Corrections

9 replies »

  1. And the point of this exercise was…….?

    il·le·git·i·mate
    ˌiləˈjidəmət/
    adjective
    1. not authorized by the law; not in accordance with accepted standards or rules.
    synonyms: illegal, unlawful, illicit, criminal, felonious; unlicensed, unauthorized, unsanctioned; prohibited, outlawed, banned, forbidden, proscribed; fraudulent, corrupt, dishonest; malfeasant.

      • John the point of External’s existence is obvious, it is to give a clear example of the meaning of the words ‘Illegitimate’, ‘Illegal’, and ‘immoral’.

        Because External’s parents were not married at the time of his/her birth External is illegitimate.
        Because External’s parents were also brother and sister, their actions in conceiving External were both illegal and immoral.

    • syn·o·nym
      sinəˌnim/
      noun
      a word or phrase that means exactly or nearly the same as another word or phrase in the same language, for example shut is a synonym of close.

      “Nearly the same” is not “the same.”

      Now, go back to elementary school.

      P.S.: Do indeed quote the section of code where that “law” is written.

      • No.
        Criticizing an act as illegal when it is not illegal can be regarded as an illegitimate criticism, but has no intrinsic bearing on the criticism’s legality.
        In the case of Israeli ‘settlements’ the use of the terminology ‘illegal’ as well as ‘illegitimate’ is a political end run around any serious discussion or just application of law. It has nothing to do with law, and the motivations of the critics also have really nothing to do with law, only a desired result.