Author Archives

Adam Levick

UKMW prompts 2nd Guardian correction to same error on church land bill

In February, following our communication with Guardian editors, an article focusing on a row between Israel and church leaders was corrected.  The article originally claimed that proposed Israeli legislation (currently on hold) would allow the state to confiscate church land in Jerusalem, when the bill actually targeted land which the church had already sold to private (Jewish) developers. However, on May 1st, the Guardian made the same error, which, after we lodged a new complaint, was corrected.

‘The Guardian View’ on the Gaza protests: one of their worst editorials on Israel ever

The Guardian once again has demonised Israel, smearing the state as one defined primarily by racism and violence – an ugly caricature which has little resemblance to reality.  The notion that Jerusalem should take security advice from the Corbyn-sympathising London intelligentsia is as risible as their suggestion that its citizens should take seriously the moralizing tales of Israeli darkness by the Hollywood left. 

UKMW prompts important addendum to Indy article on IDF ‘whooping’ video

UK Media Watch prompts a correction at The Independent to a report on a video depicting the IDF shooting a Palestinian man on the Gaza border. The original Indy report failed to include the official IDF statement about the video which was available more than an hour before.  The IDF statement significantly changes the story, as it provides Israel’s account of the circumstances – and context – by which the Palestinian man was shot.

UKMW prompts corrections at Times of London and The Irish News to false Syria “attack” claims.

Following communication with UK Media Watch, Times of London corrected a story from that day which erroneously claimed that Syrian air defences responded to an Israeli missile attack over Homs that targeted Shayrat airbase.  As we noted in our post that day, it turned out that a false alarm led to Syrian air defense missiles being fired overnight and there was no fresh attack on Syria of any sort. 

Sky News clip on Gaza riots fails to challenge multiple false claims

In a mere one minute and twenty seconds, the Sky News clip accurately capsulizes the media’s continuous credulity when faced with Palestinian soundbites that echo the narrative of proscribed terror groups – representative of a broader institutional failure to contextualise coverage of events in the region by reminding news consumers of the malevolent aims of the Hamas tyrants who rule Gaza.

Guardian and Independent parrot Hamas talking points on “Great Return March”.

The fact that 10 out of the 16 Palestinians killed since Friday have been verified by the IDF as members of terrorist groups, or that the border protests have included the throwing of Molotov cocktails, the planting of EIDs and – in at least two cases – shots fired at Israeli forces hasn’t hampered the desired media narrative: a ‘disproportionate’ Israeli response to ‘peaceful’ Palestinian protesters.

Will media report on investigation’s conclusion that Ibrahim Abu Thuraya was NOT killed by IDF snipers?

Though we may never learn what caused Ibrahim Abu Thuraya’s death on the Gaza border last December, the media’s immediate rush to judgement – presuming Israeli guilt whilst ignoring evidence undermining such accusations – once again demonstrates their institutional failure to subject Palestinian claims to the same degree of skepticism and critical scrutiny that Israeli claims are almost always subjected to.

Guardian editorial on Corbyn antisemitism row omits their own use of toxic tropes about Jews

In fairness, the Guardian – over the last few years – has been a bit more vigilant in avoiding antisemitic language, and we’re certainly glad that their editorial position on the antisemitism scandal currently engulfing the Labour Party is morally clear.  However, it would benefit their readers – and help contextualise the problem of antisemitism on the British Left – if senior editors would show a bit more self-reflection by acknowledging their own troubling history of sanctioning toxic rhetoric historically used by anti-Semites.

Indy falsely claims Fatah was founded by Arafat to merely ‘create a Palestinian state’.

The claim by the Indy journalist that Fatah as founded to promote the creation of a Palestinian state shouldn’t be seen as merely a one-off factual error, but, rather, an example of a larger media pattern of casting Palestinians as the reasonable party in the dispute by obfuscating undeniable evidence demonstrating their long history of terror, extremism, and rejectionism.

Guardian legitimises Craig Murray’s anti-Israel conspiracy theory on Russian spy poisoning

By linking to Murray’s wild, completely unsubstantiated and incendiary charges, and uncritically citing it as grounds for readers to be skeptical of the government’s assessment, the Guardian has legitimised a full-out anti-Israel conspiracy theory – the kind of malign, obsessive and often delusional Israel root-cause explanations for international events which continues to fuel antisemitism in the UK. 

Guardian op-ed refers to Ahed Tamimi as a “political prisoner”

The suggestion that Tamimi, who was arrested for assaulting an Israeli soldier and for incitement, by endorsing (on video) armed “resistance”, is a “political prisoner” is beyond absurd. The term “political prisoner” is as codified as pertaining only to those detained in violation of “freedom of thought, conscience and religion, freedom of expression and information, freedom of assembly and association”.

Contrary to Robert Fisk’s claim, Israel did offer Arafat at least 95 percent of the West Bank

Contrary to Robert Fisk’s claim, Yasser Arafat was offered was a contiguous state encompassing Gaza, east Jerusalem and considerably more than 90 percent of the West Bank. And, it’s not the “American media” making this “claim”. It’s three of the principle players during negotiations – Bill Clinton, his chief peace negotiator Dennis Ross and Martin Indyk, then the US Ambassador to Israel.

Guardian falsely suggests Haifa Arabs in 1948 faced “mass evictions” by Israeli forces

This conclusion that the flight of Arabs from Haifa was instigated by the Arab leadership, and not by the Hagana, isn’t just reached by Karsh, but by historian Benny Morris, and even radical anti-Israel historian Illan Pappe, who acknowledged that “Jewish troops had no clear intention of provoking an Arab exodus” and that “their military strategy was not calculated to produce such an outcome”.