Times of London

UK media headline fail: Do Times editors read their own articles?


A Times (of London) article about an Israeli attack on Islamic Jihad terrorists at a house in the Shati ‘refugee camp’ yesterday – which also tragically killed a Palestinian girl – was accompanied by the following headline.

headline

So, according to the headline, the Israelis admitted that the strike on jihadists represented a violation of the truce that had gone into effect at 10 AM that day.  However, there’s one problem: there’s nothing in the report by Gregg Carlstrom which even comes close to backing up this claim.

Here’s the full article (behind pay wall):

A Palestinian driving a digger attacked a bus in Jerusalem in an apparent backlash to the war in Gaza and an Israeli airstrike killed a young girl during yesterday’s seven-hour ceasefire that failed to silence the guns.

Aseel al-Bakri, eight, was killed when a missile struck her house in al-Shati ­refugee camp, according to the Gazan health ministry. Israel confirmed that it had carried out the attack.

Israel had promised to hold fire in most of the strip from 10am until 5pm, except around Rafah, where there has been heavy fighting for several days. Sami Abu Zuhri, the spokesman of the militant group Hamas, which runs ­Gaza, warned Palestinians “not [to] trust such a ceasefire”.

The brief truce, which was announced overnight, was partly in response to strong condemnation of Israel’s bombardment of a United Nations school on Sunday, military sources said. The school was being used as a shelter. At least nine people were killed, according to the UN .

Two people died in attacks in Jerusalem yesterday, apparently in revenge for the carnage in Gaza. In the first attack, shortly after noon, a man driving an excavator ran over a pedestrian and then flipped over a passenger bus. Police shot the driver dead.

The pedestrian died of his wounds, and at least five other people were injured. “Officers opened fire when it was clear that this was a terrorist attack,” said Micky Rosenfeld, a police spokesman, though he declined to ­provide evidence for that claim. Police officials have been worried about ­possible attacks inside Israel.

Witnesses said the driver was a Palestinian who lived in East Jerusalem and worked on a nearby construction site. Hundreds of Israelis gathered near the crumpled bus after the attack, many of them chanting: “Death to Arabs.”

Similar attacks have happened in the past. In 2008, for example, a Palestinian man killed three people with a bulldozer.

Hours after yesterday’s attack, a gunman on a motorcycle started shooting on Mount Scopus, close to the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. One person, an Israeli soldier, was critically injured.

Despite such violent incidents, the ceasefire and the withdrawal of most Israeli troops from Gaza provided a bit of breathing room for negotiations in Cairo. Last night Egypt announced that both Israel and the Palestinians had agreed to a three-day ceasefire beginning at 6am today.

Palestinian officials already in the Egyptian capital said that they had agreed on a unified set of demands, including the withdrawal of all Israeli troops from Gaza and the lifting of the territory’s blockade.

Israel has not sent anyone to the talks but indicated last night that a delegation would be heading for Egypt in the next three days to work on a longer-term truce. The army-backed government in Cairo is hostile to Hamas and is unlikely to accept any terms that would be unpalatable to the Israelis.

“Egypt knows what Israel wants,” said Yitzhak Levanon, who was the Israeli ambassador in Cairo from 2009 to 2011. “We trust Egypt, because Egypt understands the difficulty Israel is ­facing with Hamas.”

Although there were fewer Israeli aistrikes and Hamas rocket attacks, there was no sign of an imminent end to the war, which has so far killed more than 1,800 Palestinians, mostly civilians, and 66 Israelis, almost all of them soldiers. Israeli troops remain in a buffer zone in Gaza.

While Israel acknowledged that they carried out the attack, can anyone tell us which passage in the Times article backs up the claim in the headline that Israeli officials admitted that the attack represented a violation of the ceasefire?  

Further, as even the New York Times reported, “one Israeli official from the army agency that controls coordination with Gaza told Israel Radio that the strike took place just before the cease-fire began”. So, the timing of the IDF strike is, at the very least, disputed.

The Times got it wrong. 

3 replies »

  1. The Times and the Telegraph are usually a far cry from the Guardian bizarro world, but even they are “obliged” by the current narrative that it is Israel who is breaking all ceasefires.

    Hamas breaking a ceasefire is reported as “Ceasefire collapses”.
    Israel not actually breaking a ceasefire, which Hamas doesn’t even recognize = “Israel breaks ceasefire.”

  2. It should be made easier for these poor media makers, they should agree to a common headline when it comes to Israel, from the New York Times to the Teheran Times: Israel is the Satan.
    Well, on the other side it would betray their common bias, not so good, isn`t it?

  3. How about you all stop the hate on here, and save some innocent lives.

    You’ll feel better about yourselves.